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This week in your Massachusetts garden & landscape

Week of October 12, 2020

Towards the end of summer, Peonies produce dormant buds called eyes at the base of each stem. Plant peonies with eyes/buds no deeper than 1 to 2 inches.Towards the end of summer, Peonies produce dormant buds called eyes at the base of each stem. Plant peonies with eyes/buds no deeper than 1 to 2 inches.

Lime can be applied to lawns any time that the soil is not frozen. Get a soil test with a pH measurement to determine how much lime to apply. Visit https://ag.umass.edu/services/soil-plant-nutrient-testing-laboratory to submit your soil test.

A wooly bear’s color depends on how long it’s been feeding, its age and species.

Remove tomato support stakes and cages from the vegetable garden. Clean and store for use next year.

Consider planting scilla tubergeniana bulbs this fall for a beautiful early-spring display in the landscape. Growing just 6” tall, the flowers are light blue with darker petal stripes. Plant them under deciduous trees where they will receive plenty of sunshine prior to the leaves appearing. Plant the bulbs 3”-4” deep and 2”-3” apart. The foliage will disappear as summer approaches. Plants will spread by offsets and self-seeding. Scilla tubergeniana are hardy in zones 4-8.

To roast sunflower seeds, cover the seeds with salted water (one cup of salt per one gallon of water) and soak overnight. Drain the seeds, dry on paper towels, and spread them on a baking sheet. Bake at 300 degrees Fahrenheit, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 30 to 45 minutes. Cool and store in an airtight container.

Don’t leave any remnants of cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower in the garden. This will deter cabbage worms in next year’s crop.


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